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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our tech
leukemia. does that make a more uncertain morence? >> not only a more uncertain scie science, we actually lose ten uncrs. en reporter: and the down side of turning off a variety of experiments is what? >> we've killed innovation because the most innovative becaus projects are the projects that will go first. >> reporter: the pending budget cuts have also forced labs to etow down the hiring of promising younger scientists. >> turning them down because i have to say to them "in all honesty, i don't know whether i can take you on. on that four to five-year commitment." >> reporter: the n.i.h. hopes to restore the lost 10% if the ifncy's funding is restored, but this is one danger from the anscal cliff that isn't waiting for new year's day. the reduction in medical experiments and the hold on ingoratory jobs is happening now. wyatt andrews, cbs news, wy washington. ghanlor: in afghanistan, another insider attacked today and for inside first tt time the attacker was ackefghan woman. a police sergeant. she shot and killed an american contractor inside a compound in rabul that houses police head
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
had high school science teachers who can't negotiate a bunson burner for goodness sake. i wouldn't suggest that we necessarily give everybody a gun, it's not for everybody. but how we deal with it in utah is going to be way different than how we deal with it in chicago. >> david, one thing that came out of your interview they've thought was interesting that the nra i didn't think would ever be on, he was calling for forcing states to participate more. if you're the obama administration and you're looking for the nra's help on something, well, forcing states to participate more on the background checks, all of these things that aren't happening, if the nra is going to do that and force these conservative republicans governors to sign legislation that did that, that would be a step. >> andrea, i want to talk about the second term cabinet. chuck hagel did not get a ringing endorsement from senator schumer or -- >> what senator schumer said was really very revealing. if a democratic senator is not going to come to chuck hagel's defense, i think there is serious problems there. >> he
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. with a new project in mind, some how-to knowledge to give us an new years clutter is no match for someone with big ideas. edge, and more savings down every aisle. it only takes a few twists and turns for those bright ideas to make the new year even brighter. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. start fresh and save with hdx 20 gallon totes, a special buy at just $5.88 a piece. >>> washington, d.c. just before the sun comes up. earlier in week maureen dowd, the great maureen dowd of the new york tim"new york times" ha the op-ed page of times and the headline was "why god?" it was largely written about her friend father kevin o'neal a catholic priest in washington who began his mini essay within maureen's column by asking the question how does one celebrate christmas with the fresh memory of 20 children and 7 adults ruthlessly murdered in newtown? father o'neal went on to write, first, i do not expe
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since this show began in february, we have closed out nearly every saturday program with a segment called "foot soldiers" and it is a feature highlighting one person or group who has created positive action in the communities for change. this is large or small. and the foot soldiers have ranged from the three new jersey girls who was a presidential moderator, to dr. mcstuffins who shows girls they, too, can be doctors. and the father and son teen who got out to get out the vote for people during hurricane isaac and simply because they had a vote, and activism. all of our foot soldiers are changing our lives. f for the first time ever, i have a table full of them. and i am joined by a director of a support for children whose parents are in prison, and also, a founder for children of lgbt youth, and also project director of a center for victims of sexual assault, and also, the drek er tor of osborne association which offers rehabilitation for those in the criminal justice system. i
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i'll tell you, it might be the middle of winter, but it's more like the cast of "some like it hot" here at the exchange. it's in french. i'll let you say the actual name of this group. a group of ballet enthusiasts founded in 1974, professional male dancers. everything from ballet to modern dance, classical, original works. it's definitely adding an air of levity to the occasion. in a couple seconds, the opening bell at the nyse. as we said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times"
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. gee you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street," live from the financial capital on the world. the opening bell set to ring on that balcony in a couple minutes there the big board, west virginia university and syracuse university, the football teams playing in the new era pinstripe bowl at yankee stadium this saturday. i know melissa is going p. >> for sure. we are carpooling, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should tru
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)